#43
   ...
O.K., here we go folks...after lots of searching and emails, Cis & I have come up with a dinner we're both really anxious to try and we hope some of you will join us. Rox - I don't think you'll have any trouble finding any of the ingredients, except maybe the Tef Flour and you can substitute for that...

Our menu -
Lamb Stew
Iab
Injeera
Queen of Sheba Salad
Tej - the honey wine
Maandazi - a Kenyan donut

Cis will be along to post her stew recipe and here is the rest of the dinner -

Injeera
Serving Size : 4

1/2 cup whole wheat flour -- or tef flour
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
2 eggs -- beaten
2 cups buttermilk
1 tablespoon oil

Sift together the flours, sugar, salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Combine eggs, buttermilk and oil. Add this mixture all at once to flour mixture. Stir until smooth.

Pour 2 tablespoons of batter into a hot, lightly greased 6-inch skillet so that the batter covers the bottom. Lift and quickly rotate the pan to even out the batter. Return skillet to medium heat. Cook about one minute or until lightly browned on the bottom. Invert bread onto paper towels. Serve warm. Makes approximately 16 to 20 (serves three to four).

Cuisine:
"Ethiopian"

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IAB
Cottage Cheese and Yogurt
Yield: 1 quart

Iab is a white curd cheese very much like the Greek feta. Special herbs are added (and sometimes chopped vegetables) which give it its characteristically acid taste. Since the cheese used in Ethiopia is not available here, this recipe is an attempt to simulate lab.

In a 1-quart bowl:

Combine: 1 Ib. SMALL-CURD COTTAGE CHEESE or FARMER CHEESE

4 Tbs. YOGURT
1 Tbs. GRATED LEMON RIND
1 tsp. SALAD HERBS
2 Tbs. CHOPPED PARSLEY
1 tsp. SALT
1/4 tsp. BLACK PEPPER.

The mixture should be moist enough to spoon but dry enough to stay firm when served. Drain off excess liquid. One or two heaping tablespoons of lab is placed on the Injera before each guest.
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CHEF KURT LINSI'S QUEEN OF SHEBA SALAD
Yield: 8 small salads
Chef Linsi serves this salad when he prepares an Ethiopian dinner, as he feels that a salad is lacking in the Ethiopian presentation. It's pretty hot too, so be careful with the hot-pepper sauce and hot chilies.

In a 1-quart bowl:

Combine: 1 1/2 Ibs. FIRM TOMATOES, cut in tiny wedges with seeds removed

1/2 cup SWEET ONIONS, finely chopped
1 clove GARLIC, finely chopped
1 HOT CHILI PEPPER, finely chopped
1/2 cup PEPPERONI, thinly sliced (optional).
Sheba Sauce

Combine: 1 cup KETCHUP

1/4 cup VlNEGAR
1/2 cup OIL
1/2 cup SWEET WHITE WINE (Muscatel or Madeira)
1 tsp. WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE
1 tsp. SALT
1/4 tsp. BLACK PEPPER
few drops TABASCO SAUCE.

Marinate the tomato mixture in the sauce. Serve in sauce dishes without lettuce or drain well and place in the center of the Injera.

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TEJ
Honey Wine
Yield: approximately 1 quart
Tej is the Ethiopian wine made from "honey raw with comb" cooked with hops (Gesho), and it takes a special talent to make it. We simulated Tej for our Ethiopian dinner as follows:

Combine: 1 pint WHITE WINE, light, neither dry nor sweet.

1 pint WATER
4 Tbs. HONEY.
Chill and serve in 1/2-cup decanters or wine glasses.

Be sure it is very cold. Whatever white wine you use should not have strong characteristic taste of its own. A mild white wine of the Soave or Riesling type thinned with water and to which honey is added is as close to Tej as one can get without going through the fermentation process. (You may be able to find honey wine ready to use. Ask at your local liquor store. If not available proceed as above.)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Extracts from: Bea Sandler. The African Cookbook. Diane & Leo Dillon (Illust.). New York: Carol Publishing Group, 1993.

To order a copy of The African Cookbook, please contact:

The Carol Publishing Group
600 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022

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and for dessert!! The recipe for Maandazi came from a gal who lives in Switzerland, but is from Kenya - Jikoni, she posts on Discuss Cooking forum and what a great source for ideas.

Maandazi

This is more like a Kenyan doughnut(goes great with tea kenyan style...brewed)
2 cups plain flour
3 tbs sugar
1 cup coconut milk
1 tsp corasely ground cardamom
A tsp dry yeast, and oil for frying

Mix all the ingredients with cocnut milk and bind them into a dough and knead the dough(add water if neccessary or flour if it still sticks to the side of the mixing bowl. The dough is ready only when you can lift it off the bowl without it trying hard too to stay there!)leave the dough in a warm place covered for 2 to 3 hours for it to rise. Then roll out the dough and cut intoo whatever shapes using cookie cutters and deep fry in hot oil on both sides.

Can be eaten hot or cold.I usually cook maandazi once a month and keep in an airtight container for at least a week, after that they go hard. Kenyan style tea is basically half milk half water, sugar and tea leaves, slowly brewed until it nearly boils over, then strained, and the tea leaves thrown away.and served piping hot(I can never stand adding cold milkk to my tea, it just makes it cold!
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Since the Maandazi can be made ahead of time, I think I'll make them a day to two before and hope we can stay out of them!!!

Cis, your turn! Now, who all's game???

P.S. I forgot to post the recipe for Ethopian Berbere - it's a spice mixture to be added to stews and such...

Ethiopian Berberé
HOT!

Seasonings:
1 t powdered ginger
1 t ground cardamom
1 T star anise, crushed
1 t fenugreek seeds, crushed, optional
1 t cinnamon
2 T cayenne
2 T salt
1 T red pepper flakes
2 t ground coriander
1 t turmeric
1 t nutmeg
1 t allspice
1 T black pepper
½ c paprika
½ c red wine
¼ c peanut oil
¼ c fresh OJ
--or--
1 T wine
1 ½ t peanut oil
1 ½ t OJ
per 1 T of the spice mix.

Toast spices, add wine, and cook 2 - 3 minutes, until a uniform paste is formed. Remove from heat and cool. Add peanut oil and OJ, mix thoroughly.


I'm done!!
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#44
  Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th cjs O.K., here we go fol...
How Fun!
Here is the recipe for the stew. It says you can use beef or lamb. I went with lamb.
Siga Wot (Spiced Beef/Lamb Stew)
Serving Size : 6

3 large onions -- chopped
3 tablespoons corn oil
3 tablespoons Chow (see below)
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon salt -- to taste
2 cups water
1 1/2 pounds beef chuck or Lamb -- cut into 1/2-inch cubes
CHOW:
1 garlic clove -- sliced
1 teaspoon grated ginger root -- or ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground caraway
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/4 teaspoon ground mustard seed
1/4 teaspoon ground avish -- not found in America
1/4 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/3 cup water
1/4 teaspoon fresh hot red chili
1/4 teaspoon paprika

In dry pan over moderate heat, stir fry the onions for 4 minutes to reduce the bulk, stirring constantly. Add the oil and stir fry for about 1 minute longer.

Add the chow and tomato paste and continue to fry. Then add the salt and 1/4 of the water. Stir well. Add the beef/lamb cubes and the remaining water. Cover the pan and cook for 45 minutes, or until the beef/lamb is tender. There should be a moderate amount of sauce. Serve warm with Injeera.

CHOW: Process everything together into a smooth mixture that will be as thick as toothpaste. Refrigerate with a jar with a tight cover. Use when needed. Makes 1/2 cup.

I thought it needed some veggie, so I cut three smallish eggplants into chunks, salted them and coated with green hot sauce. I let them soak about 20min. I added them right in the begining with the onions
Also for Ingeera, we met an Ethiopean woman at a shop in Ottawa. She said that when she makes Ingeera and Tef is unavailable she uses, and I quote: "2 fistful self rising flour 1 fistful barley flour and a bit of cornflour" (masa harina I think). She showed me where I could get ready made Ingeera in the Mid East store too.
Had to do my dinner before the lamb and the ready made Ingeera spoiled, but I will do it again with you guys too.
Cis
Cuisine:
"Ethiopian"
Cis
Empress for Life
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#45
  Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th cjs O.K., here we go fol...
Quote:

1 tsp. SALAD HERBS





What are salad herbs?

I am going to make the stew with beef; my guys don't like lamb a whole lot. I found the Teff flour at Whole Foods...how lucky! Now, the spices, any tips on grinding them? I have a mortar and pestle but I can't seem to be able to grind finely with it. I had a coffee grinder that I used for that, but it mysteriously disappeared. I don't remember if it worked well for that or not. Thanks for any suggestions!
Tammy
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#46
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th TwilightKitten [blockquote]Quote:[h...
Would a food processor or blender work? I know Sharon and I have Vitamixers and that would blend them in a heart beat.

I betcha a nickel that Whole Foods wuuld grind it for you. Just ask them sweetly...lol.
Jan

Please spay and neuter your pets.
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#47
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th Half_Baked Would a food process...
My Vitamix is in the garage in need of repairs. I will have to get on that and order the part - heaven knows there's enough room in the new kitchen for it! We had a little coffee grinder for spices had to be put back into use as a coffee grinder - the burr grinder died - only 4 freakin' years old and it just quit!

I do have a "thunderstick" with an attachment for grinding things like spices - I saw it in a box in the garage yesterday - may have to dig it up!
You only live once . . . but if you do it right once should be enough!
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#48
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th Half_Baked Would a food process...
I have a really small food processor that I used to try to grind spices, but it didn't work like I wanted it to. Thank you for the suggestion though...
Tammy
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#49
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th TwilightKitten I have a really smal...
"What are salad spices?"
Tammy, I'd say that was a mixture of like basil, oregano,parsely, chives... y'know stuff like that. But I'm not for sure, so wait till someones else confirms or changes that
Cis
Cis
Empress for Life
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#50
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th farnfam "What are salad spic...
I'd say the same as Cis - any herbs you like in a salad dressing...BUT, I'LL GO LOOK IN MY NEW BOOK....

...the book mentions 34 herbs for salads....use whatever you want!
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#51
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th cjs I'd say the same as ...
Thank you! Now, do you think it means fresh or dried?
Tammy
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#52
  Re: Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th TwilightKitten Thank you! Now, do y...
well, since I only have chives, oregano and thyme up and growing, I will use a combination.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
Reply
Ethiopian Dinner - Review April 30th


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