#27
   ...
Just curious of everyone else's experience and opinion about the formats in which recipes appear in print.

Most of us are used to the usual, cookbook-style format that has a list of ingredients followed by a list of instructions. Here is an example, using my Sun-Dried Tomato Cream Sauce (for use on pasta and/or chicken):

Ingredients:
  • 3 or 4 Cloves Garlic, minced
  • 2 Tbsp Butter
  • 2 C Chicken stock
  • 1 C Sun-dried tomatoes
  • 2 C Heavy cream
  • 1/2 C Fresh Basil, chopped (or more to taste)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Instructions:
  1. Sauté the garlic in the butter in a saucepan.
  2. Add the chicken stock and tomatoes. Simmer for 10 minutes.
  3. Add heavy cream and basil. Simmer and reduce to desired thickness.
  4. Add salt and pepper. Purée the sauce until smooth.
When I worked in a restaurant, however, I discovered a different format: a spreadsheet. I liked it much better, and have used it ever since, when saving recipes onto my computer. Here's the same recipe in the spreadsheet format (to avoid website formatting problems, I have replaced extra spaces with periods and marked it as a "code" block):


Code:
Code:
+-----------------------------------+-----------------+-------------------------------------------------+[br]+.............Ingredients...........+.....Quantity....+...................Method........................+[br]+-----------------------------------+-----------------+-------------------------------------------------+[br]+.Garlic, minced....................+..3 or 4 cloves..+.Sauté in a saucepan.............................+[br]+.Butter............................+.....2 Tbsp......+.................................................+[br]+-----------------------------------+-----------------+-------------------------------------------------+[br]+.Chicken stock.....................+.......2 C.......+.Add to saucepan.................................+[br]+.Sundried tomatoes.................+.......1 C.......+.Simmer for 10 min...............................+[br]+-----------------------------------+-----------------+-------------------------------------------------+[br]+.Heavy cream.......................+.......2 C.......+.Add to saucepan.................................+[br]+.Basil, fresh chopped..............+..1/2 C or more..+.Simmer & reduce to desired thickness............+[br]+-----------------------------------+-----------------+-------------------------------------------------+[br]+.Salt & pepper.....................+.....To taste....+.Puree until smooth..............................+[br]+-----------------------------------+-----------------+-------------------------------------------------+



In the restaurant, each of the recipes printed this was was place into a plastic, protective sleeve, then the collection of recipes for a particular station were put into a special binder that was hung on the wall at eye level. Thus, whoever was working at that station would be able to keep the book open to the recipe upon which he was working, and would not have to look back and forth between the ingredient list to see how much of a certain ingredient was needed for a particular step.

Any thoughts?
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#28
  Recipe formats labradors Just curious of ever...
I've never worked in a restaurant and only ever used cookbooks, so I like your original format just fine. BTW, that recipe sounds good! Thanks for posting it.

Maryann
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#29
  Recipe formats labradors Just curious of ever...
Labradors, the "spread-sheet" format is what I have been using for about 10 years now, tho didn't know that is what it is called and that restaurants use this format. (When I post recipes on this forum I go back into the recipe and retype it for the "cookbook" style!)

Like you, I prefer this way because it is easier to depict the ingredients...you see them right away vs. having to read the entire line. That may sound petty, but I'd like to know right away if I have in the pantry what the recipe calls for and then be concerned about quantity.

I also like to see what has to be done to that ingredient, and having that info all on the same line is easier, rather than scrolling up and down the recipe a hundred times. Don't know about you but I often find myself reading and re-reading and re-reading and . . . a recipe's directions, up and down, up and down, trying to find where I left off, etc. This format, for me, is easier to use. I only wish there was some way to make a template of this format, then just fill in the blanks, etc., so to speak. (There probably is a way to template this, I'm just not that saavy with the Word program loaded on this new computer, which was "free". I've always used WordPerfect, since it came out way back in the 70's.)

Anyway, re the format, personal preference I guess.

EDIT:

P.S. The recipe sounds delicious. Just could be lunch for tomorrow!
Vive Bene! Spesso L'Amore! Di Risata Molto!

Buon Appetito!

Linda
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#30
  Re: Recipe formats MUSICMAKER Labradors, the "spre...
" was place into a plastic, protective sleeve, then the collection of recipes for a particular station were put into a special binder that was hung on the wall at eye level. "

It makes it much easier for a new person in the kitchen. My problem is that, being vertically challenged, my eye level is much lower than theirs.
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
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#31
  Re: Recipe formats Lorraine " was place into a p...
I can handle any recipe format easily, except C@H - can not stand that format.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#32
  Re: Recipe formats MUSICMAKER Labradors, the "spre...
Quote:

I only wish there was some way to make a template of this format, then just fill in the blanks, etc., so to speak.



Although I happen to refer to it as a spreadsheet, I don't know if there is a more formal name for it. "Spreadsheet" is just the computerese term for a ledger having rows and columns, especially when used for accounting.

Instead of using a word-processing program (e.g. MS-Word, Word Perfect, Wordstar [showing my age, there]), this format is more suited to a spreadsheet program (e.g. MS-Excel or Lotus). The Open Office suite (a package of free, open-source programs similar to those in MS-Office) also has "Calc," which is their version of Excel.

If you don't have a spreadsheet program, or do not wish to get something new like that (even the freebie), then you should be able to accomplish the same thing in your existing word-processing program, presuming it's more than just a simple text editor and does actually display things in a WYSIWYG ("what you see is what you get") manner. All you need to do is to have the program set up a TABLE with three columns (ingredient, quantity, method) and as many rows as you need. After entering the actual recipe, you can neaten it up a little bit by setting the borders around the blocks of cells for each step.

To see some examples, download the following files: the MS-Excel example, or the MS-Word example.

Quote:

P.S. The recipe sounds delicious. Just could be lunch for tomorrow!



Thanks. Enjoy!
If blueberry muffins have blueberries in them, what do vegan muffins have?
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#33
  Re: Recipe formats labradors [blockquote]Quote:[h...
Thanks, Labrador. . .this new computer has all of the MS programs on it (some type of promo offered at the time). When I was fooling around, checking things out about a week ago I saw the "rows", "columns", etc. you just mentioned. Looked it up again this a.m. and fooled around with it (not saving anything just yet) and was able to set up a format!!! I've been working on a cookbook of recipes from our ancestors (an Italian heritage cookbook) to hand down to my boys and this will make this project so much faster now. There are also clip arts and watermarks that can be imported! I'm so glad you brought this up! This is going to make the cookbook look really great, and special!!! Thanks much!!!

Made the sauce already -- really quick and very, very good!!! Just waiting now for the pasta to finish. . .which will make this even better!!! Will be adding some freshly grated Parma-Reggie tho -- gotta have my cheese!!! In my book, this sauce is a keeper, all!!! Quick and very tasty!!! Adding a salad of baby lettuces and raspberry walnut dressing to complete the meal!

Thanx again, Labrador!!!
Vive Bene! Spesso L'Amore! Di Risata Molto!

Buon Appetito!

Linda
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#34
  Re: Recipe formats MUSICMAKER Thanks, Labrador. . ...
"Parma-Reggie" - wasn't he in the Italian version of the Archies? LOL!

Glad you liked the sauce. As far as the format is concerned, I usually start entering a new recipe by copying one of the existing recipe files, then editing it. Thus, if you start by downloading the Excel version of the recipe (see my links, above), you'll be able to use that as a template, if you like.

It's been almost a year since the last time I made this sauce, and talking about it has caused me to want to make it again. I DO have some sun-dried tomatoes right now, so I'll just have to get some heavy cream.
If blueberry muffins have blueberries in them, what do vegan muffins have?
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#35
  Re: Recipe formats labradors "Parma-Reggie" - was...
Quote:

"Parma-Reggie" - wasn't he in the Italian version of the Archies? LOL!




Could've been! Could've been!

Quote:

As far as the format is concerned, I usually start entering a new recipe by copying one of the existing recipe files, then editing it. Thus, if you start by downloading the Excel version of the recipe (see my links, above), you'll be able to use that as a template, if you like.



Will fool around with this later, after dinner & things settle down. . .don't like to start things and get interrupted! Will let you know how it goes! Thanks!

Quote:

It's been almost a year since the last time I made this sauce, and talking about it has caused me to want to make it again. I DO have some sun-dried tomatoes right now, so I'll just have to get some heavy cream.




This really was good! I'm 100% Sicilian but still like to try what others make with tomatoes and entitle recipes as "sauce". Have come across some that you would never know!

Do you have difficultly obtaining sun dried tomatoes there? Or are you as depraved as Roxanne???!!! Where I live, there is a "Little Italy" section of town and for the most part these (tomatoes) come a dime a dozen. . .they are considerably inexpensive (like 69 cents/lb). I like to keep the pantry as "full" as possible so I usually purchase a few pounds of them and store them in a jar covered with EV olive oil. After the tomatoes sit in the oil for a while the oil takes on the taste of the tomatoes and then I use that oil in other dishes. A way of infusing oil without even trying, so to say. It turns out really good. I've also "dried" the tomatoes in the oven, overnight. Using different types of tomatoes, like the green or yellow tomatoes, even the cherry or grape tomatoes. This method also works well in a pinch. They are just as good as the sun dried. You should try this if you can.

Oh, this just reminded me of a pasta dish with vodka. . .will pull the recipe and post it later. I think there are a few members out there who would like that one!!! Another quick pasta dish but way off the map as far as sauce is concerned! Gonna have to make that soon...it's been a while!
Vive Bene! Spesso L'Amore! Di Risata Molto!

Buon Appetito!

Linda
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#36
  Recipe formats labradors Just curious of ever...
Never having worked as a professional chef myself, I've also only used cookbooks. I like your spreadsheet, but have never seen it before. I think I could get used to it, because when making a new recipe I spend a lot of time reading and rereading the instructions. It would be great if a program like MC, with lots of layout options, could include this professional style as well.
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