No-Knead Bread fans--new book out
#10
  Re: (...)
Saw this on Breadtopia, so ordered it from my library. I still love making this bread!

http://www.amazon.com/My-Bread-Revolutio...creative=380733
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#11
  Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by Mare749 (Saw this on Breadtop...)
Have you ever made the Artisan in Five bread? Same idea but much more flexible timewise.
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#12
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by Cubangirl (Have you ever made t...)
I think I have two (large) bread books that I haven't even opened yet. Shoot, maybe I'll have three....

The Bread Bible , Rose Levy Beranbaum (oops, I have made the biga from this one)

Bread Alone, Daniel Leader & Judith Blahnik
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#13
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by cjs (I think I have two (...)
Thanks for the reminder, I had read about the book, but forgot to order it. Got it online today 9along with 3 mini dessert books). My copy of the 18 hour bread is taped to the cupboard, with all my variations, cooktimes, and yields. We'd be lost without that recipe!
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
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#14
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by Cubangirl (Have you ever made t...)
Quote:

Have you ever made the Artisan in Five bread? Same idea but much more flexible timewise.




I have not, but was thinking of ordering that book since my library didn't have that one. Can you tell me how the recipe is different from the original 18 hr. no-knead recipe. Does it have to do with the proofing time? I rarely let it go the full 18 hours anyway.
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#15
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by Lorraine (Thanks for the remin...)
Quote:

Thanks for the reminder, I had read about the book, but forgot to order it. Got it online today 9along with 3 mini dessert books). My copy of the 18 hour bread is taped to the cupboard, with all my variations, cooktimes, and yields. We'd be lost without that recipe!




More mini desserts...YUM!
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#16
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by Mare749 ([blockquote]Quote:[h...)
Here's is the basic recipe with my adaptations. I've made others, the oat flour one is great. I think the book is worth buying.

EXPORTED FROM LIVING COOKBOOK

ARTISAN OVAL LOAF***** (5 MINUTES A DAY)

Yield: 3 oval loaves

My preferred pot for this is my 3.5 matte black oval LC. It produces an oval tall load perfect for toast, garlic bread or sandwiches. I don't grease the pot, but I do use the parchment paper. We cut the bread after fully cooled on a wood cutting board and leave it cut side down directly on the board, with an gallon ziplock just place over the top, unsealed. I bake mine after at least 7 days and I use a bit from the last batch.

Oven Temperature: 450°F

3 cups water (use 4 cups if King Arthur flour is used)
1½ TBS. granulated yeast (2 packets)
1½ TBS. kosher salt
6½ cups (2 pounds) unbleached, all-purpose flour, more for dusting dough
1/4 cup Rice flour for gloves and parchment

TIPS AND TIMELINES
Recipe is easily doubled or halved.

The authors website suggests that the grapefruit-sized loaf is pretty small. It makes a one-pound loaf, which is much smaller than most commercial loaves. If you need more, try a generous cantaloupe-sized piece and bake longer, up to 25-30% more time in the oven. And you will find it better if you let it cool, it will slice better and seem less "wet".

The total weight of the master recipe is 2 pounds of flour. Using 3 cups of water we figure the hydration is about 75-78%. If you use a brand of flour that has a higher protein level, such as King Arthur, we suggest that the hydration be closer to 81-83%.

Hydration is based upon weight ratios not volume. Water weights 1 gm per mL, (.035 oz) and one cup is .24 liters, or 245 grams(8.575 oz). One cup of flour weights 5 oz. Example: 2 pounds (32 oz) of King Arthur flour at 83 percent hydration would require, 26.56 ounces of water.

Mixing and Storing the Dough

Warm water slightly (about 100° degrees).

Add yeast and salt to the water in a measuring cup. Weight the flour and put into refrigerator container. I use a rectangular Cambro container with a lid. You are done when everything is uniformly moist, without dry patches. This step is done in a matter of minutes and will yield a dough that is wet and loose enough to conform to the shape of it's container.

Cover, but not with an airtight lid. Let dough rise at room temperature until it begins to collapse (or at least flattens on the top) approximately 2 hours (or up to 5 hours).

You can use a portion of the dough any time after this period. Fully refrigerated wet dough is easier to work with than dough at room temperature. So, the first time you try this method it's best to refrigerate the dough overnight (or at least 3 hours), before shaping a loaf. Better after 7-10 days.

Store the remaining dough in the refrigerator in your lidded (not airtight) container and use it over the next 14 days (can last over 14 use smell and texture as a guide, will be a bit like sourdough and may rise less.) You'll find that even one day's storage improve the flavor and texture of your bread. This maturation continues over the 14-day storage container. If you mixed your dough in this container, you've avoided some cleanup. Cut off and shape more loaves as you need them. The dough can also be frozen in 1-pound portions in an airtight container and defrosted overnight in the refrigerator prior to baking day. If using the last 1/3 save a bit for the next batch.

Use latex type gloves to handle the dough and use parchment paper to rest the dough. Use rice flour on gloved hands and parchment. The dough seems to stick much less to the gloves that to hands. Take the dough out of the storage container, fold it in the air and shape and drop onto the parchment. If dough is so wet it can not be handled, sprinkle the surface of the dough with the flour used to make the dough. Pull up and cut off a third of the container (or ½ if used before, about 1¼ pounds (a bit larger than grapefruit-size) piece of dough, using a serrated knife. Don't knead, just "cloak" and shape a loaf in 30 to 60 seconds. Hold the mass of dough in your hands and add a little more flour as needed so it won't stick to you hands. Gently stretch the surface of the dough around to the bottom on all four sides, rotating the ball a quarter-turn as you go. (Turn dough in hands to lightly stretch surface, creating a rounded top and a lumpy bottom.) Most of the dusting flour will fall off; it's not intended to be incorporated into the dough. The bottom of the loaf may appear to be a collection of bunched ends, but it will flatten out and adhere during resting and baking. The correctly shaped final product will be smooth and cohesive. Handle the dough as little as possible. The entire process should take no more than 30 to 60 seconds.

Set the dough to rise in the rice dusted parchment in an oval gratin. and put the shaped loaf in the microwave to bring it to room temperature. Heat it for 1½ or 2 minutes at 10% power. Take out and place parchment with loaf in LC pot and allow to rise about 1-2 hours. Then ½ hour before baking, before preheating the oven, put water in a 2 cup Pyrex in microwave and heat for 5 minutes.

I then preheat the oven to 450°F Convection Bake, Take the dough on the parchment out and put the pot with lid on in the oven to preheat. While that is happening, I take the dough that has been resting in the parchment in the pot, place it on an oval gratin pan and put it in the microwave (off) with the heated water where it sits until ready to go back in the LC and into the oven. No problems with cleanup. Preheat oven for at least ½ hour.

When it is time to bake, it goes back into the LC parchment and all.

Dust the top of the loaf liberally with flour, which will allow the slashing knife to pass without sticking. Slash a ¼-inch-deep cross, "scallop, or tic-tac-toe pattern into the top, using a serrated bread knife.

Bake on Convection Bake 450°F for 30 covered and 15 uncovered for a 1½ lbs. loaf.

I bake mine after at least 7 days and I use a bit from the last batch.

Preparation Time: 30 minutes Cooking Time: 45 minutes Inactive Time: 170 hours
Total Time: 171 hours and 15 minutes

Source: Adapted from “Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day,” by Jeff Hertzberg and Zoë François (Thomas Dunne Books, 2007)

Recipe Type: Bread

PS: I've made it after the minimal time and it was good too, just not as good as later.
There is are a couple of threads on the CI bb and Zoe joined and gave us tips and answered questions which was really helpful. Her website Zoe bakes has some great recipes besides the bread. Not sure how to make the image smaller, sorry.
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#17
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by Cubangirl (Here's is the basic ...)
I'm finally almost breadless in the freezer, so it's about time to play again - and this sounds like fun.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#18
  Re: Re: No-Knead Bread fans--new book out by cjs (I'm finally almost b...)
This is very interesting information, CG. Thank you for posting the recipe. Really want the book, so ordered it from Amazon. Will post my results in 7 days!
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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