Leftovers Are Our Friends!!
#11
  Re: (...)

Leftover fried abalone, leftover abalone hash....oh my, this was such a nice dinner.

But, see that slice of previously frozen Rye bread???? That was our 'pusher' - and you know what was on my counter?? Leftover 18 hour bread. (that'll teach me to have 2 pineapple martinis.

Anyway, thank you so much for sharing your abalone, Sharon, it was so tasty!!!!
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#12
  Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by cjs ([img]http://i3.photo...)
So, we need you to tell us how you and Sharon cooked the abalone, please! Everything I've read about it says that it is difficult to get right. BTW, once again, great pic!
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#13
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by Mare749 (So, we need you to t...)
Aren't friends great! Even when they're leftovers...LOL!

Safe travels Sharon and Bob! Check in soon! I can't wait to hear about your next culinary adventure! I know it will be great!
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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#14
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by Gourmet_Mom (Aren't friends great...)
Sharon does her abalone a little different than I do, so I'll let her tell her method.

Generally you prepare the abalone by slicing across the grain parallel to the bottom of the 'foot,' no more than 3/8" thick. You want to pound the steaks gently, but firmly enough to soften the meat. I use clarified butter and the steaks should not be fried more than 45 seconds per side - the more heat applied, the tougher the meat will be. You can dip the steaks in egg wash, then flour or just dust with flour before frying (just seasoned flour is my preferred way, but the egg wash is good also).

I made the abalone hash from an old clam hash recipe I have that we just love. In fact, Roy is going to scrounge thru the freezer for a bag that (I think) is in there of Razor clams - he said he didn't get enough of the hash.

Then the whole time they were here, we talked about having truffle buttered popcorn using Sharon's truffle butter - but we ran out of time. But, last night we were still craving it so we made it for dessert.


It's been so long since we have had popcorn in butter (we always use a tad of corn oil for frying and then a little of the black or white truffle oil and truffle salt to flavor), that we didn't care for the butter. So, we'll save the truffle butter Sharon shard with us for other goodies.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#15
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by cjs (Sharon does her abal...)
Beautiful!
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#16
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by Trixxee (Beautiful!...)
Okay, thanks Jean. Everything looks/sounds delicious!
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#17
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by Mare749 (Okay, thanks Jean. ...)
With a photo like that, you can see why the Spanish word for popcorn is palomitas - "little doves."

Don't forget to dredge some of that in some peanut butter!
If blueberry muffins have blueberries in them, what do vegan muffins have?
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#18
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by labradors (With a photo like th...)
Oh, wouldn't that be good!!
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#19
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by cjs (Oh, wouldn't that be...)
I love to make popcorn, but hate the "melted butter" as well as the "burnt butter beacuse it's added in the beginning" to give it flavor.

So I do this:

Preferably, use canola oil, a Revere Ware stock pot with copper plated bottom that's about 8" tall (think old kitchen set), good Jiffy Pop kernels (yellow kernels), and one room temp stick of butter.

Heat the Revere Ware stock pot to medium high heat and add the oil to about 1/8" thick. Heat the oil a bit until you see it almost swirl. Pour enough popcorn kernels to cover the bottom, no overlapping. If the oil does not reach the top of the kernels, add it a bit at a time and swish.

Return the pot to the heat and when you START to hear the popcorn popping, take it offside heat and add as much butter you want. Return to the heat. Swish vigorously to distribute the butter.

Shake, shake, shake your booty and your popcorn as it's popping, keeping lid tight as popcorn expands according to steam and the bottom on the heat.

When the popping comes down to one pop per 3 seconds, you're done. Stop. Actually, with a gas stove top, I've already anticipated the stop time because Revere Ware can cool down quickly, too.

Turn off the heat, and pour sporadically into a big bowl to add salt to taste to each layer.

Can ya tell it was one of my staples in college? I was asked to make popcorn for the Friday Night Flicks, I made paper bag fulls and they were passed around the theater.

Barbara
When life gives you lemons, make lemonade. Then find someone whose life has given them vodka.
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#20
  Re: Re: Leftovers Are Our Friends!! by BarbaraS (I love to make popco...)
That's so funny, Barbara! It seems you've really perfected your technique.

It's been a long time since I've had anything but microwave popcorn. I wonder if my smooth cooktop would work? Plus, most of my pots have heavy bottoms. I give up!
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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