Making Paneer Cheese
#11
  Re: (...)
How fun this is - just bring a gallon of whole milk to a boil, add a quart of buttermilk and drain for a couple of hours. It looks beautiful already.



Also, finally got to the Lemons Chef Dave & Pam Nelson gave us - all zested and juiced.


Now, to find ideas for using all this wealth that's NOT a dessert. Gained too much weight over the holidays. Will make a batch or two of curd for the freezer, but what else????????????????????
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#12
  Re: Making Paneer Cheese by cjs (How fun this is - ju...)
Oh Yummy! Lemon Curd!

Jean, what do you do with Paneer cheese? I saw it was a fresh famers cheese from India.
Erin
Mom to three wonderful 7th graders!
The time is flying by.
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#13
  Re: Re: Makking Paneer Cheese by esgunn (Oh Yummy! Lemon Cur...)
Erin, you can use it in place of ricotta - similar consistency. I want to use it on the Indian Curry chicken pizza I've been playing with. Anxious to see how it melts.

This is what I did - it's a compilation of 4 or 5 methods that looked pretty good and it worked really well.

Making Paneer Cheese

1 gallon milk, whole
1 quart buttermilk
Canola oil for frying

Pour the gallon milk into a large pot. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Watch carefully, as it will boil over almost as soon as it starts to boil. (Note: I used a rubber spatula every couple of minutes to keep any milk from sticking to bottom of pot and scorching.) As soon as the milk begins to boil, pour the buttermilk into the pot in a steady stream while stirring constantly. The milk will separate into curd and water.

Place a cheesecloth into a colander, and pour the milk mixture through it. Reserve some of the liquid for later. Let milk mixture sit in the colander for a couple of hours, or until it stops dripping. (Note: at this point your cheese will be quite firm)

After the curds are strained and settled, transfer them to a food processor. Process until smooth. It should be able to form a ball if it is the right consistency. If it is too dry, add a little of the reserved liquid and process again. The consistency should be like a firm ricotta cheese.

At this point wrap tightly and refrigerate overnight (the author stresses this is an important step). The next day, cut into bite-size squares and deep fry (author does not recommend just frying in an inch or so of oil because the squares could crumble when you try to turn them over) until the just firm up, about 30 seconds.It adds almost no fat to the recipe if the oil is hot enough and it is fried quickly. Drain on paper towels.

At this point, either add to a recipe, or the fried pieces can be frozen for up to 30 days in a Ziploc bag after chillling.

Here it is ready to be chilled until tomorrow -


I've found quite a few used for it - here's one I want to make to go with Chicken Tikka Masala

Absolutely Perfect Palak Paneer
By: MCFALONE

"This Indian dish combines fresh spinach and ricotta in a creamy curry. Use paneer if you can find it! It is absolutely wonderful with basmati rice or naan (Indian flat bread). The key is in the spices, which you can find at an Indian grocery."

• 6 tablespoons olive oil
• 2 cloves garlic, chopped
• 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger root
• 2 dried red chile peppers
• 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
• 2 teaspoons ground cumin
• 1 teaspoon ground coriander
• 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
• 3/4 cup sour cream
• 3 pounds fresh spinach, torn
• 1 large tomato, quartered
• 4 sprigs fresh cilantro leaves
• 8 ounces ricotta cheese
• coarse sea salt to taste

1. In a large saucepan heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil and saute garlic, 1/2 tablespoon of ginger, red chilies (optional ingredient) and onion until brown. Mix in the cumin, coriander, turmeric and sour cream (add more or less to achieve desired creaminess). Add the spinach, handfuls at a time until it is cooked down, about 15 minutes total. Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.

2. Pour spinach mixture into a blender or food processor and add the tomato, the remaining 1/2 tablespoon of ginger, and cilantro (add more or less according to taste). Blend for 15 to 30 seconds, or until the spinach is finely chopped. Pour back into the saucepan and keep warm over low heat.

3. In a medium frying pan heat 3 tablespoons of olive oil over medium heat, and fry cheese until browned; drain and add to spinach. Cook for 10 minutes on low heat. Season with salt to taste.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#14
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by cjs (Erin, you can use it...)
I'm confused...not surprising...but what is the point in frying it? It seems like it would be more useful in the curry dish in its creamy state.
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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#15
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by Gourmet_Mom (I'm confused...not s...)
I don't know, but everything I've read says to do it.....
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#16
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by cjs (I don't know, but ev...)
Well, fill me in when you finish with it. I'm curious.
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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#17
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by cjs (I don't know, but ev...)
I always thought that frying was just one way of preparing Paneer.??????
You only live once . . . but if you do it right once should be enough!
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#18
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by Harborwitch (I always thought tha...)
So that's a way to prepare it to serve...not for a recipe? I'm thinking that makes more sense. I guess we'll see tomorrow.

I seriously want to try this, because it sounds so fun...like a really cool science experiment...LOL! I guess it's the school teacher in me. If I was still teaching self-contained and all subjects, I'd make this a science experiment at school. My classroom in Southport was across the hall from the teacher's workroom/lounge where I had access to a full sink, microwave, full size free-standing stove and a full size fridge. (I still miss that place.) We'd get to eat our results....LOL! Wouldn't that be fun?!?!?!?
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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#19
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by Gourmet_Mom (So that's a way to p...)
From what I can google, frying the cheese cubes very briefly helps them hold their shape when used in dishes.

Seems to be the main reason. I'll probably play with both ways tomorrow.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#20
  Re: Re: Making Paneer Cheese by Gourmet_Mom (So that's a way to p...)
GEEZ! I just realized I totally missed the first two posts on this thread. I know you can freeze the lemon juice, but can you freeze the zest? I made the mistake of freezing zest that I PEELED from the lemons. I think that's why my lemon vodka was not as good as I thought it would be...that and using raw sugar(?). It turned an ucky brown and tasted funny. Won't do that again! I have yet to figure out if it was the frozen zest peels or the sugar...I'm thinking the sugar.

ANYWAY, there's something I make that takes a lot of zest, but I can't remember what it is right now...a dressing, I think. OMG! I just remembered! It's the Spinach Salad with Pine Nut Dressing that I haven't made in FOREVER! Time to make that again! I can't BELIEVE it....I haven't made it months!
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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