Cobbler Question
#11
  Re: (...)
I've seen two different versions. One, the topping is put in the bottom of the pan, then the fruit is added. They say the topping will rise to the top when cooing. The other uses the drop biscuits on the top of the fruit. Which do you use? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!.
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
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#12
  Re: Cobbler Question by Lorraine (I've seen two differ...)
My mom always made a crumbled pastry topping for it. Yum!
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#13
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by Mare749 (My mom always made a...)
Thanks, Maryann. Do you have the recipe?
Practice safe lunch. Use a condiment.
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#14
  Re: Cobbler Question by Lorraine (I've seen two differ...)
On top. By definition, cobblers have only a top cake/crust and no bottom crust.
If blueberry muffins have blueberries in them, what do vegan muffins have?
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#15
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by labradors (On top. By definiti...)
Crumb Topping:

Mix 1 cup flour, 1/2 firm butter, and 1/2 cup brown sugar (packed) until crumbly. Bake 50 minutes, then add foil on top for last 10 minutes if it is getting too brown.

My mom made a lot of fruit desserts when I was growing up, and she would sometimes top them with an oatmeal or granola mixture. (apple crisp) Other times she would make a standard pie pastry and make a lattice top. A few times she made a batter for the top. I think it may have been made with Bisquick. Oh, and for blueberry cobbler, it was always made with dumplings. That was my personal favorite.

So, I guess it wasn't always crumb topping.
Maryann

"Drink your tea slowly and reverently..."
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#16
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by Mare749 (Crumb Topping:[br][b...)
I'm from a different school on cobblers - I like using pie crust rather than biscuit-type so I get more fruit. And, only on top.



...and then serve it like this..............


apricot-pineapple cobbler with dark chocolat ice cream. Loved this since I was a kid.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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#17
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by cjs (I'm from a different...)
Here's a Cuisine recipe. I made this and it was sooo delicious.



This took it over the top. A stunning combo.

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#18
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by losblanos1 (Here's a Cuisine rec...)
I'm in Jean's camp with this one, but I'll go one better. Mom would sometimes enclose the filling in the dough (makes 2) and bake them on a sheet pan. Although, I prefer mine with vanilla ice cream.
Daphne
Keep your mind wide open.
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#19
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by Gourmet_Mom (I'm in Jean's camp w...)
Alternatively, you could go with a buckle or a cottage pudding - each of which has the fruit mixed into the cake part. Here is the recipe I posted, a while back, for Blueberry Cottage Pudding with Lemon Sauce. Maybe it's not what you need right now, but it IS something from that same, general family of desserts (cobbler, buckle, cottage pudding, brown Betty, etc.).
If blueberry muffins have blueberries in them, what do vegan muffins have?
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#20
  Re: Re: Cobbler Question by labradors (Alternatively, you c...)
I've used this for years and find it very useful to have it all in one place. I am hoping some of you might find it useful as well. The original fruit chart is PDF so I had to copy it and the spacing got a bit messed up when I transferred to Living Cookbook. My favorite is the Butter Cookie Dough. Wonderful with Apricots and Peaches.

MIX AND MATCH FRUIT COBBLERS CI July, 1996

Four cobbler toppings and a fruit chart give cooks freedom of choice based on fruit, time, and ingredients on hand.
The challenge: Served with whipped or ice cream, cobblers taste as good as most fruit pies and are much easier to assemble. The difference among cobblers and crisps and crumbles is that cobblers usually have a pastry or biscuit topping, while crisps and crumbles have crumb toppings. With this recipe, we particularly wanted to understand the dynamics of the fruit. Because cobblers are so casual, would "x" amount of fruit, regardless of variety, bake up more or less the same under the crust? Did the fruit need to be thickened, sweetened, flavored? If so, how much?
The solution: Most of the fruits we tested, when baked with sugar, produced a nice quantity of slightly thickened juices. Two fruits, however, responded very differently. Apples were so dry we ultimately added water to make them juicy enough. At the other end, sour cherries were too watery, and ultimately demanded more thickener than the other fruits. Stated simply, baked fruits need sugar. On its own, most fruit is too tart for this type of dessert, and sweet cobbler toppings and ice cream accentuate its tartness rather than mellowing it. It turns out that sugar also helps with thickening, turning the fruit juices into a very light syrup.
Even though sugar helped thicken the juice, it wasn't quite enough. We found a number of starches worked well at unobtrusively thickening the juices, but we preferred cornstarch because it is most widely available. One final observation about thickener: The riper the fruit, the lower the pectin level, so if baking prime specimens, you may want to add a tad more starch.
For good measure: Since fruit sweetness varies, we recommend you start by adding the lower of the suggested amounts, then taste and increase as needed. Also, be mindful that cooked fruit tends to be a bit tarter than its fresh version, so add a bit more sugar than you think you need.


MASTER RECIPE FOR FRUIT COBBLER
Enough for one 8" square or one 9" round pan. These recipes can easily be doubled and baked in a 13" X 9" pan.
Clearly, these fruits can be mixed. If sugar quantities for the selected fruits are different, simply average the two amounts. Any of the toppings listed below can be used with any of the fruits. If you’re short on time, the Butter Cookie Dough
Topping and the Batter Fruit Cobber can be put together very quickly. Serve any of the cobblers that follow with ice cream or lightly whipped cream.
1. Prepare pastry, shortcake or cookie-dough topping for fruit. (Refrigerate shortcake or pastry topping.) Batter Fruit Cobbler that follows is self-contained.
2. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees. Mix cornstarch, sugar to taste, and optional dry spices in medium bowl. Add prepared fruit and optional liquid flavorings; toss to coat.
3. Place fruit in 8" square or 9" round baking pan. Cover with selected topping, and bake on cookie sheet until golden brown, 45 to 55 minutes.

BUTTER COOKIE DOUGH TOPPING Serves 4 to 6
This recipe was featured in an article titled “Boarding House Cuisine,” which ran in the May 1990 issue of Cook’s magazine. All of us who tasted the cobbler thought it was one of the best we had ever tasted. Six years and a lot of cobblers later, I still
feel this topping makes one of the best cobblers you’ll probably ever eat. Because the cookie dough is quite sweet, use the smaller amount of sugar suggested in the fruit chart.
½ cup all-purpose flour
¼ tsp. baking powder
Pinch salt
8 TBS. unsalted butter, softened
½ cup sugar
½ large egg or 1 yolk
¼ tsp. vanilla extract
1. Mix flour, baking powder, and salt in small bowl; set aside.
2. Beat butter and sugar until well blended. Beat in egg and vanilla. Add flour mixture; stir until just combined.
3. Drop dough onto prepared fruit by heaping tablespoons. Bake, following instructions in master recipe.



RICH SHORTCAKE TOPPING Serves 4 to 6
Because the biscuit easily absorbs juices, this shortcake topping is particularly nice with berries. If you want to top the cobbler with individual biscuits, increase the recipe by half and roll it to three-quarters inch thick, brushing the dough rounds
with milk and sprinkling them with sugar.
1 cup all-purpose flour
1½ tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. salt
4 TBS. cold unsalted butter, cut into ¼" pieces
2 TBS. cold vegetable shortening
7 TBS. milk
1 TBS. sugar
1. Mix flour, baking powder, and salt in food processor fitted with steel blade. Scatter butter pieces over mixture, tossing to coat butter with a little of the flour. Cut butter into flour with five 1-second pulses. Add shortening; continue cutting in until flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal, with butter bits no larger than a small pea, about four more 1-second pulses. Turn mixture into medium bowl.
2. Pour 6 TBS. milk into flour mixture. Toss with fork until mixture forms large clumps. Turn mixture onto work surface; lightly knead until mixture just comes together. Place dough on sheet of plastic wrap and press into either square
or round disk, depending on pan shape. Refrigerate while preparing fruit. (Can be refrigerated up to 2 hours before baking.)
3. On a lightly floured work surface, roll dough to 10" square or circle. Lay dough over prepared fruit; tuck excess dough in between pan side and fruit. Brush dough with remaining tablespoon of milk; sprinkle on sugar. Cut four 2" air vents in dough top and follow baking instructions in master recipe.

FLAKY PASTRY TOPPING Serves 4 to 6
You can effortlessly achieve a soft and crisp-textured crust by tucking the pastry between the fruit and pan wall. The fruit juices keep the side crust tender while the dry oven heat crisps up the top. To turn your cobbler into a pandowdy, follow Master Recipe for Fruit Cobbler, topping it with Flaky Pastry Topping. Once the crust has fully set, but not browned (about thirty minutes into baking), remove the dessert from the oven, scoring the crust lengthwise and crosswise to form 2" squares. Using a large spoon or metal spatula, press the partially baked crust down into the fruit. Continue to bake until the crust is set and golden.
1 cup all-purpose flour
¼ tsp. salt
1 TBS. sugar, plus 1 additional TBS. for sprinkling over dough top
6 TBS. chilled unsalted butter, cut into ¼" pieces
2 TBS. chilled all-vegetable shortening
2–3 TBS. ice water
1 tablespoon milk (or water)
1. Mix flour, salt, and sugar in food processor fitted with steel blade. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture, tossing to coat butter with a little of the flour. Cut butter into flour with five 1-second pulses. Add shortening; continue cutting in until flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal, with butter bits no larger than a small pea, about four more 1-second pulses. Turn mixture into medium bowl.
2. Sprinkle 2 TBS. ice water over flour mixture. Using rubber spatula, fold water into mixture. Then press down on mixture with broad side of spatula until dough sticks together, adding up to 1TBS. more water if dough will not come
together. Place dough on sheet of plastic wrap and press into either square or round disk, depending on pan shape. Refrigerate while preparing fruit. (Can be refrigerated up to 2 days before baking.)
3. On a lightly floured work surface, roll dough to 10" square or circle. Lay dough over prepared fruit; tuck excess dough in pan between pan side and fruit. Brush dough top lightly with milk or water and sprinkle with additional sugar. Cut four 2" air vents in dough top and bake following instructions in master recipe.


BATTER FRUIT COBBLER Serves 4 to 6
After testing a number of batter-based cobblers, we found this recipe, adapted from New Southern Cooking (Knopf, 1986), to be one of the best in its category. Many of the batter cobblers reminded us too much of cake, quick bread, or custard. Unlike the others, this one had a real cobbler feel to it.
6 tablespoons unsalted butter
¾ cup all-purpose flour
¾ cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar
1 tsp. baking powder
¼ tsp. salt
¾ cup milk
2 cups sliced fruit or berries (not sweetened or thickened)
1. Adjust oven rack to lower-middle position and heat oven to 350°F. Put butter in 8" square or 9" round pan; set in oven to melt.
2. Whisk flour, ¾ cup sugar, baking powder, and salt in small bowl. Add milk; whisk until just incorporated into dry ingredients. When butter has melted, remove pan from oven. Pour batter into pan, without stirring it into butter, then arrange fruit over batter. Sprinkle with remaining tablespoon sugar. Bake until batter browns, about 40 to 50 minutes.

QUANTITY PREP CORN SUGAR FLAVORINGS
STARCH
BLUEBERRIES
2 pts. fresh or 24 oz. frozen Rinse and pick over 2 tsps. ½ to 3/4 cup ½ tsp. ground cinnamon, 1 tsp. vanilla

BLACKBERRIES
2 pts. fresh or 24 oz. frozen Rinse 1 TBS. 1/3 to ½ cup 1 tsp. vanilla extract

STRAWBERRIES
2 pts. fresh or 24 oz. frozen Stem and rinse, leave whole if 1 TBS. 1/3 to ½ cup 1 tsp. vanilla extract
small or medium or halve if large

STRAWBERRY/RHUBARB
10 oz each Stem and rinse, leave whole if 1 TBS. 1/3 to ½ cup 1 tsp. vanilla extract
small or medium or halve if large
cut rhubarb into 1/3" pieces

RASPBERRIES
2 pts. fresh or 24 oz. frozen Rinse 1 TBS. 1/3 to ½ cup 1 tsp. vanilla extract

SOUR CHERRIES
1¾ lbs. fresh or 24 oz. frozen Stem and pit 1½ TBS. 2/3 to ¾ cup ½ tsp. almond extract, 1 tsp. Kirsch

ITALIAN PLUMS
1¾ lbs. fresh Pit and quarter 2 tsps. ½ to 2/3 cup ½ tsp. ground cinnamon, 1 tsp. vanilla

APPLES
1¾ lbs. tart, firm Peel, quarter, core, 2 tsps. 1/3 to ½ cup ½ tsp. ground cinnamon, 1 tsp. vanilla
and slice thick

PEARS
1¾ lbs. Peel, quarter, core, 2 tsps. 1/3 to ½ cup ½ tsp. powdered ginger or nutmeg
and slice thick 1 tsp. vanilla

APRICOTS
1¾ lbs. Pit and halve 2 tsps. ½ to 2/3 cup 1 tsp. vanilla extract, ½ tsp. almond

PEACHES/NECTARINES
1¾ lbs. Peel, pit, and slice thick 2 tsps. 1/3 to ½ c u p 1 tsp. vanilla extract, Pinch cloves, 1 TBS. brandy
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