help finding recipe for red grape focaccia
#7
  
One of my friends had a signature dish she always brought to baby showers and other special events, and she is heartbroken that she lost it.  I've finally tracked it down and am hoping someone on these forums can help!  The recipe was in Cuisine at Home Issue 59 from October 2006.  It is called "Red Grape Focaccia with Cheese Fondue" and is on page 47.  If someone out there has that back issue, could you send me the recipe?  I'd love to surprise her with it for the holidays!

Staci
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#8
  Re: help finding recipe for red grape focaccia by StaciC (One of my friends ha...)
Here you go Staci.

Focaccia
with rosemary and sea salt

Makes one 9 x 13" loaf

Total time: 4 hours + rise for the biga

Whisk the water and yeast together
for the biga in a glass or metal
bowl. Add 1 cup flour and whisk
until smooth. Cover with plastic
wrap and chill overnight (but no
longer than 16 hours).

Before preparing the dough, bring
the biga to room temperature,
setting it on the counter for 1 hour.
It will be thick and foamy.

Combine the biga, 2 cups flour, 2 t.
salt, and sugar for the dough in the
bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a
dough hook. Mix on low speed for
1 minute, or until incorporated.
Increase speed to med.-low and mix
until smooth, 5 min. If the dough is not
wet, sticky, and falling from the hook,
add water, 2 t. at a time, until it is.
Transfer dough to a bowl
coated with nonstick spray.
Pull the dough up and over
itself until its top is smooth,
then coat with nonstick
spray. Cover with plastic
wrap and let rise in a warm,
draft-free place until doubled
in size, 11⁄2–2 hours.

Bear in mind that focaccia does take some
time to make. That’s because it’s built on a
biga [BEE-gah], a mixture of water, yeast,
and flour that’s slowly fermented for flavor.
The bread will taste best if the biga
ferments overnight in the fridge, but 3–4
hours at room temperature is okay.
A wet, sticky dough is normal so don’t
be tempted to add flour, or the focaccia’s
texture will change. I recommend using
bread flour for its high gluten (protein)
content—the dough will rise better and
the bread will be chewier than it would
be if made with all-purpose flour.
Dealing with the dough
http://www.CuisineAtHome.com october 2006 45

For the Biga—
Whisk Together; Add:
11⁄2 cups water, room temperature
1 packet instant dry yeast
(1⁄4 oz. or 21⁄4 t.)
1 cup bread flour

For the Dough—
Combine; Let Rise:
Biga
2 cups bread flour
2 t. fine sea salt or table salt
1⁄2 t. sugar

Top Dough with:
2 T. fresh rosemary needles,
blanched, see Basics, Page 32
4–5 T. extra-virgin olive oil
1⁄2 t. coarse sea salt or kosher salt

Per 1⁄12: 145 calories; 30% calories from fat; 5g total fat;
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#9
  Re: help finding recipe for red grape focaccia by StaciC (One of my friends ha...)
Here's the rest of the recipe.

Red Grape Focaccia

with three cheese fondue
Makes 1 cup cheese; Total time: 10 minutes
 
1 recipe Focaccia, prepared up to
the baking step, Pages 45 and 46
 
112 cups seedless red grapes
14 cup dry white wine
2 T. shallots, minced
12 cup heavy cream
12 cup Boursin cheese, crumbled
13 cup blue cheese, crumbled
2 T. Parmesan, grated
1 t. minced fresh thyme
Freshly ground black pepper
Juice of 12 a lemon
 
Bake focaccia for 5 minutes, then top
with grapes; continue baking until
golden brown, 20–25 minutes. Cool
on a rack for 5 minutes, then slice.
 
Simmer wine and shallots for the fondue
in a small saucepan until reduced
by half, about 3 minutes. Add cream
and reduce heat to low.
 
Gradually whisk in cheeses until
melted. Finish with thyme, pepper,
and lemon juice; serve warm.
 
Per 112: 257 calories; 49% calories from fat; 14g total fat;
28g carb.; 559mg sodium; 1g fiber; 7g protein
 
 
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#10
  Re: help finding recipe for red grape focaccia by StaciC (One of my friends ha...)
blanching herbs

You already know about the benefits of blanching
vegetables. But did you know that herbs can also
benefit from blanching? This technique dramatically
preserves and improves the color of herbs that
might otherwise brown during cooking. Blanching
also has a mellowing effect on hardy, strongflavored
herbs, such as rosemary and thyme. In fact,
the fresh rosemary used on the focaccia on Page
45 was blanched first to help tame its pungency
and keep it from turning brown during baking.
However, delicate herbs, like basil, sage, mint, and
tarragon, will lose flavor if blanched too long.

To blanch, you’ll need a pot of boiling water
and a bowl of ice water. Once the pot of water
reaches a rolling boil, plunge in the herbs—how
long they’re in the water depends on how hardy
they are. Blanch rosemary for 20 seconds; for basil,
just dunk it in the water to wilt, three seconds tops.
As soon as you remove the herbs, drop them
into ice water to lock in the color and stop the
cooking. Once cool, drain on paper towels and use
immediately, or freeze for up to a month.
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#11
  Re: help finding recipe for red grape focaccia by StaciC (One of my friends ha...)
I cannot thank you enough for this! She said it was a complicated recipe that could not be replicated from memory, and now I see what she meant! This is a dear friend who has had an exceptionally difficult year, and tomorrow she will be at my home for Christmas Eve. I am going to print out this recipe and surprise her with it tomorrow! Thank you!
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#12
  Re: help finding recipe for red grape focaccia by StaciC (One of my friends ha...)
You're welcome Staci. Merry Christmas. Smile
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