Let's talk about hash browns.
#11
  Re: (...)
Why do they seem to take sooo long to brown?

Maybe you can help me, or I guess I could look it up . Nah, y'all will know more and have helpful hints.

I bake my potatos in the microwave and cut them into chunks. I chop up onions.

I heat the pan, add oil/grease du jour. Then I add my onions with a sprinkle of sugar. I fry them til they are about 1/3 way done, then I add the s&p and potatos.

I cover them for 15 min, then stir, 15 min then stir and sometimes another 15 min. I have the heat just past medium.

I usually add gr pepper and bacon or ham.

How do you make them?

Wait a minute...bet the 12" cast iron pan will brown them quicker. The 10" is too small for our batches...I cook enough for 4 so we have leftovers.
Jan

Please spay and neuter your pets.
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#12
  Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by Half_Baked (Why do they seem to ...)
Your main problem I believe is covering them. You are holding the steam in instead of letting it evaporate. I was doing that in the past when I fried my potatoes and was complaining about them not browning. Same O same O.
Don't wait too long to tell someone you love them.

Billy
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#13
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by bjcotton (Your main problem I ...)
I boil my potatoes, it seems quicker. Mash them roughly and add sharp grated cheese and fine chopped onion with herbs, and butter, beaten egg and S&P. Add milk to a dropping consistancy. Tablespoons on a hotplate or pan, and turn when browned. I think Billy is right, perhaps covering them steams them instead of browning.
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#14
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by vannin (I boil my potatoes, ...)
Having said that my concept of a HBr may be entirely different from yours.
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#15
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by vannin (I boil my potatoes, ...)
That seems just too simple for me not to have figured out after all these years. Perhaps one of my 1000 cookbooks might have helped me out if I'd read a Hash Brown recipe.

There are some things that I'd never looked up - like frying chicken. After I read a recipe 25 yrs ago, my chicken improved dramatically. Before that I had just watched people do it and thought, "well that's easy enought". Obviously not.

Dale, in Georgia, that's one variation of a potato pancake. I never thought of making them silver dollar size. That is nice.
Jan

Please spay and neuter your pets.
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#16
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by Half_Baked (That seems just too ...)
Fun, isn't it Janluv, I like frittery things for the function centre, made ahead, say, in the morning, or day before. Cob things and ball things. Reheated, oven or deep fryer.
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#17
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by vannin (Fun, isn't it Janluv...)
I believe that's how Dale makes the stuffing for twice baked potatoes too...right dear?

I Googled fried potatoes and most of them agreed that you could cover the potatoes, but remove the cover for browning.

Check out this website Jan...

http://southernfood.about.com/od/hashbro...50809f.htm
Don't wait too long to tell someone you love them.

Billy
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#18
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by bjcotton (I believe that's how...)
I do a garlic and basil browned new potatoes - Par boil and then cook the new potatoes and garlic in oil - but If I want it to brown quicker - I add butter. That will brown much faster - especially if you are using olive oil. Toss in fresh chopped basil when they are done. YUMMY!

It seems like with out the butter - they would never brown.
Also, leave them alone - don't stir too much so they have a chance to get a crust going. That is my biggest problem - always trying to stir them.
Erin
Mom to three wonderful 7th graders!
The time is flying by.
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#19
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by esgunn (I do a garlic and ba...)
Yes Billy bro. It is more or less, I don't add egg to the twicebakeds unless I am finishing them m'solf. They need to be grabbed just as they have peaked at the rising and served so everyone can see how brilliant you are. I have used the skins for lining with the right sized skinned seeded tomatoes, putting in some filling of chopped ham, and/or bacon (cooked) fresh breadcrumbs and herbs, with an egg broken into the cavity to fill it up. It is nice to put some buttered bread crumbs on top, mixed with a few gratings of cheese. Very good with mushrooms served around it, and sprinkled with chopped parsely. Best if the taties are left with a good lining of potato flesh. S&P all over the place And diligent searchery is involved with matching potato to tomato. I haven't done this for so long.
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#20
  Re: Re: Let's talk about hash browns. by Half_Baked (That seems just too ...)
Seems we all do our fried tatoes differently. Yes, I always a cast iron skillet - size depending on how many I'm fixing them for and I always start out with more because they do cook down. IMO, fried potatoes should take at least an hour to an hour & 1/2 to be able to get them nicely brown with all the crusty goop.

Start out with veggie oil (or duck fat if I have it - for the best tasting fried tatoes in the world!!) and slice up (raw) potatoes, a couple cloves of garlic, and slices of onion and layer in the skillet adding a little s&p with each layer. (only layer them to make it easier to turn and mix up, 'cause I usually fill the skillet too much to start)

I cover mine for the first half hour, on med. low heat, turning often. The last 1/2 hour (or till they are done, I uncover them and not turn as often so the crusty goop will develop with each turning.

to me, fried potatoes should never be rushed. I have one cast iron skillet that will hold 10# of potatoes and onions that I used when the kids were home and camping.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
www.achefsjourney.com
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