Removing mold...
#8
  Re: (...)
But not from food! I just thought I'd ask here since I'm stumped.

Our lake house is in a very humid area. The flagstones (and there are a lot of them from the entrance walk, down wide steps to the patio, then to the dock) have a greenish cast that is slippery when wet, so I'm assuming it's some kind of mold. The only way that I can think to clean it is Clorox and I really don't want to do that. Has anyone had this problem and have any more environmentally-friendly suggestions? I'd appreciate the help.
Vicci

my cooking adventures
http://www.victoriasdays.blogspot.com
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#9
  Re: Removing mold... by foodfiend (But [i]not[/i] from ...)
Pressure Wash it. We get alot of that up here in the Pacific Northwest. They have mildew removers, but they are not friendly to plants.
Erin
Mom to three wonderful 7th graders!
The time is flying by.
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#10
  Re: Re: Removing mold... by esgunn (Pressure Wash it. W...)
Quote:

Pressure Wash it. We get alot of that up here in the Pacific Northwest. They have mildew removers, but they are not friendly to plants.




Really? Just high-pressure water? I thought that something would have to be added, and maybe scrubbing done, etc. This would be great! Thanks.

Now, is there any kind of "coating" we could apply that would keep the mold from growing again?
Vicci

my cooking adventures
http://www.victoriasdays.blogspot.com
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#11
  Re: Re: Removing mold... by foodfiend ([blockquote]Quote:[h...)
I suppose you might think this is overkill, but what about muriadic (sp?) acid????? That's what I would try.
Retired and having fun writing cookbooks, tasting wine and sharing recipes with all my friends.
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#12
  Re: Re: Removing mold... by cjs (I suppose you might ...)
This area of the world uses pool acid diluted---but the moldy areas are usually not around plantings and we do not have much in the way of wooden structures or features.

No answer to your question from here but am curious if we are going to be in that neck of the woods---
"Never eat more than you can lift" Miss Piggy
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#13
  Re: Re: Removing mold... by cjs (I suppose you might ...)
Quote:

I suppose you might think this is overkill, but what about muriadic (sp?) acid????? That's what I would try.




I used muriatic acid when we were building our lake house. The main floor is stone and it all had to be cleaned before sealing, so I was told to use this stuff. It was a pain, as I recall. When I add the acid to water, it would bubble and smoke, producing nasty fumes. The acid solution was slopped onto the floors, allowed to work, then scrubbed and excess soaked up in a sponge and deposited in a bucket. Then, after using it, the "waste" had to be neutralized with large quantities of baking soda before disposing of. My back was in a lot better shape then, and I'm looking for a product that can be applied, then allowed to work on its own, then rinsed. I'm liking the easy solutions as I get older!

Erin, I found out that while the pressure washer is a "quick fix" it will not kill the mold spores and they will return in a few weeks to a few months, depending on humidity. So I have to kill the mold, somehow, then reseal. After a lengthy internet search, I'm almost sold on something called BioWash.

Still searching...
Vicci

my cooking adventures
http://www.victoriasdays.blogspot.com
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#14
  Re: Re: Removing mold... by foodfiend ([blockquote]Quote:[h...)
You might research vinegar - and see if that would do it for you. My hubby said he would suggest, pressure washing - gets most off of it. Then clean it - then seal with some sort of concrete sealer.

Good Luck. Let us know what you find out.
Erin
Mom to three wonderful 7th graders!
The time is flying by.
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